How 5htp helps you lose weight

When you start thinking about getting a wider bathroom mirror, you know you’re in trouble—especially if the present one goes wall-to-wall. And when the Post Office says it’s going to give you your own ZIP code, that does it. You stamp your foot, call a contractor to repair the hole you just made in the floor, and vow that you’re going to do something about all that flab. You want to be slim, sure, but how are you going to accomplish that? Well, duh—by losing weight, of course.

Americans have been losing a lot of weight lately. Unfortunately, most of it has been from their wallets. Compared to the weight-loss industry, there is probably no enterprise, with the possible exception of government, that promises so much to so many, yet delivers so little to so few—while raking in piles of money for consistently achieving near-total failure. You’ve probably heard it all before: diets don’t work, any weight loss won’t last, some diets are bogus, others are harmful, the “guarantees” are worthless, the promoters are crooks, etc. (Now you’ve heard it all again—sorry.)

The sad thing is, much of that is true. And despite our collective obsession with weight loss, we have become the earth’s fattest, least-fit people—including our kids—and it’s getting worse all the time. That’s great news for the weight-loss hucksters, whose skill at separating people from their money must make politicians green with envy, because these people fork it over willingly! (P. T. Barnum was right.)

Supplements Can Help with Weight Loss

supplementsSince the laws of physics have not been repealed lately, it bears repeating that there are only two ways to lose weight: (1) reduce energy intake (consume fewer calories), and (2) increase energy expenditure (burn more calories). Simple, no? Simple, not—it’s very hard for most people to do. It’s for the strong of heart and mind. It takes willpower and self-discipline, without which your chances of losing weight are about the same as those of Congress being seized by a sudden attack of ethical behavior.

Fortunately, though, the laws of chemistry haven’t been repealed either, and there are ways in which your willpower and self-disciplined efforts to take in fewer calories and burn off more calories can be augmented by the reactions of certain nutritional supplements. Let’s look at two of them: 5-HTP, which helps reduce energy intake, and EGCG (from green tea), which helps increase energy expenditure.

5-HTP Suppresses Appetite

In the human body, the amino acid 5-HTP (5-hydroxytryptophan) is the immediate precursor to one of the brain’s most important neurotransmitters, serotonin. Serotonin helps to regulate mood, sleep, and appetite, among other things. In cases of serotonin deficiency (which can arise in different ways), there is a tendency to become depressed, to sleep poorly, and to overeat. It is believed, e.g., that genetically induced serotonin deficiency is a common factor in obesity, and there is no doubt that this compound has a major influence on eating behavior.1

It almost goes without saying that when you have a deficiency of some substance, you should try to correct it by supplementing with that very substance—or, in some cases, with a precursor substance, which is sometimes more desirable. To correct serotonin deficiency, it’s preferable to take not serotonin itself, but 5-HTP.* Your body converts much of it to serotonin, which is found not only in the brain but also in relatively high concentrations in blood platelets and in the intestinal wall. (Serotonin is a powerful stimulant of smooth muscle and may play a role in promoting intestinal peristalsis.) By boosting brain serotonin levels, 5-HTP helps create a feeling of satiety (fullness), thus suppressing appetite. Hence, energy intake is reduced (weight-loss key #1).

*Although it occurs naturally in the human body, 5-HTP is obtained for use as a supplement from the seeds of an African plant, Griffonia simplicifolia. It is the identical molecule.

5-HTP Reduces Caloric Intake

Most of the clinical studies on the use of 5-HTP for weight loss were done by a group of Italian researchers at the University of Rome in the early 1990s. In one such study on 19 obese women (a 5-week, double-blind, crossover trial in which each woman served as her own control), 79% of the women reported a decrease in appetite while taking 5-HTP.2 This was borne out by measurements of their actual caloric intake: it was found that supplementation with 5-HTP reduced the women’s daily intake by 508 calories—a 22% reduction compared with placebo. Over the 5-week period, the women lost an average of 3.1 lb with 5-HTP, vs. 0.9 lb with placebo. The amount of 5-HTP used daily (taken in three divided servings) was 3.6 mg per pound of body weight; this corresponds to a total of 450 mg per day for a 125-lb woman, or 900 mg per day for a 250-lb woman.

5-HTP Produces Weight Loss, Diet or Not

In a second study, the Italian researchers put 14 obese women on a 1200-calorie/day diet for 6 weeks.3 Some were given 300 mg of 5-HTP 30 minutes before meals (a total of 900 mg per day), while the others were given placebo. Over the 6-week period, the women taking 5-HTP lost 6.8 lb, on average, compared with 1.5 lb for the women on placebo.

In the same study, the researchers had previously tested the same women during a 6-week period in which they were given the same daily 5-HTP (or placebo) regimen, but without any dietary restrictions. Over that 6-week period, the average weight loss was less (not surprisingly), but still appreciable: 3.5 lb with 5-HTP and 1.1 lb with placebo. Thus, with or without dietary restrictions, the women in this study lost substantial amounts of weight (10.3 lb total) while taking 5-HTP—4 times as much as with placebo (2.6 lb total).

5-Fold Greater Weight Loss with 5-HTP

In yet a third study, of essentially the same design as the one just discussed, but with 20 obese women, the Italian researchers found that 300 mg of 5-HTP taken 30 minutes before meals resulted in a 6-week weight loss of 7.3 lb with 5-HTP vs. 1.8 lb with placebo when the women were on the restrictive 1200-calorie/day diet.4 Without the diet, the women had 6-week weight losses of 3.7 lb and 0.6 lb, respectively. Thus, the total weight losses over the 12-week period of this study were 11 lb with 5-HTP and 2.4 lb with placebo—a nearly 5-fold difference. The 11-lb weight loss represented 5% of the women’s starting weight of 220 lb.

“. . . oral administration of the
green tea extract stimulated
thermogenesis and fat oxidation
and thus has the potential to
influence body weight and
body composition . . . .”

In this third study, 5-HTP also produced dramatic results in terms of the women’s feelings of early satiety, i.e., feeling full earlier than usual during a meal. When the women were not on the restrictive diet, 100% of those who were taking 5-HTP reported early satiety. Even when they were on the diet, however (but taking 5-HTP), this feeling persisted: the figure then was a remarkable 90%. Clearly, the feeling of early satiety led the women to eat less than usual, resulting in the weight losses observed.

Slow Buildup Is Best with 5-HTP

In the studies discussed above, about two-thirds of the women reported mild nausea while taking these very large doses (up to 900 mg/day) of 5-HTP; in the second and third studies, nausea occurred during the first 6 weeks but not during the second 6 weeks. In real life, the easy way to avoid nausea caused by 5-HTP is to start with a small amount and build it up gradually over a period of 2 weeks; this is sufficient time to allow the body to adjust, and thereafter the supplement is well tolerated.5

-written by Will Block at Life-enhancement.com

Posted in diet, Uncategorized.